User perspectives and ethical experiences of apps for depression: A qualitative analysis of user reviews

Bowie, Dionne and Sas, Corina and Iles-Smith, Heather and Sunram-Lea, Sandra-Ilona (2022) User perspectives and ethical experiences of apps for depression: A qualitative analysis of user reviews. In: CHI 2022 - Proceedings of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems :. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings . ACM, New York, 21:1-21:24. ISBN 9781450391573

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Abstract

Apps for depression can increase access to mental health care but concerns abound with disparities between academic development of apps and those available through app stores. Reviews highlighted ethical shortcomings of these self-management tools, with a need for greater insight into how ethical issues are experienced by users. We addressed these gaps by exploring user reviews of such apps to better understand user experiences and ethical issues. We conducted a thematic analysis of 2,217 user reviews sampled from 40 depression apps in Google Play and Apple App Store, totaling over 77,500 words. Users reported positive and negative experiences, with ethical implications evident in areas of benefits, adverse effects, access, usability and design, support, commercial models, autonomy, privacy, and transparency. We integrated our elements of ethically designed apps for depression and principles of nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, autonomy, and virtue, and we conclude with implications for ethical design of apps for depression.

Item Type:
Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings
Additional Information:
© ACM, 2022. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of ACM for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in CHI '22: Proceedings of the 2022 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems https://doi.org/10.1145/3491102.3517498
Subjects:
?? mobile mental healthdepressionuser experiencesethicsuser reviews ??
ID Code:
166081
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
22 Jun 2022 09:35
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
26 May 2024 01:50