Hospital-based generalist social workers’ views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care social workers:a grounded theory

Firn, Janice (2016) Hospital-based generalist social workers’ views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care social workers:a grounded theory. PhD thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Background: In the United States inpatient generalist social workers in discharge planning roles work alongside specialist palliative care social workers to care for patients. As a result two social workers may concurrently be involved in the same patient’s care. Previous studies identifying components of effective collaboration, which impacts patient outcomes, care efficiency, professional job satisfaction, and healthcare costs, were conducted with nurses and physicians. The components of effective collaboration for generalist social workers’ interactions with specialist palliative care social workers are unknown. Aim: To explore inpatient generalist social workers’ views of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with specialist palliative care social workers. Methods: Using a grounded theory approach, qualitative interviews with inpatient generalist social workers (n=14) were systematically analysed to develop a theoretical model of generalist social workers’ collaboration with specialist palliative care social workers. Results: The emerging theoretical model of collaboration consists of: 1) trust, which is comprised of a) ability, b) benevolence, and c) integrity, 2) information sharing, and 3) role negotiation. Effective collaboration occurs when all pieces of the model are present. Collaboration is facilitated when generalists’ perceptions of trust are high, pertinent information is communicated in a time-sensitive manner, and a flexible approach to roles is taken. Conclusion: Trust is increased when generalist social workers’ perceive the specialist palliative care social worker has the necessary skills to identify and address patient needs, manage interactions with the multidisciplinary healthcare team, support the generalists’ roles, and adheres to social work professional values. Opportunities for formal and informal communication boost collaboration, along with regular access to the specialist palliative care social worker. At the organisational level effective collaboration is hindered by a lack of clarity regarding roles. Research about specialist palliative care social workers’ perceptions of what facilitates or hinders collaboration with generalist social workers is needed.

Item Type:
Thesis (PhD)
ID Code:
86567
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
01 Jun 2017 10:24
Refereed?:
No
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
24 May 2020 00:35