Conducting polymer-based multilayer films for instructive biomaterial coatings

Hardy, John George and Li, Hetian and Chow, Jacqueline K. and Geissler, Sydney and McElroy, Austin and Nguy, Lindsey and Hernandez, Derek S. and Schmidt, Christine E (2015) Conducting polymer-based multilayer films for instructive biomaterial coatings. Future Science OA, 1 (4). p. 1. ISSN 2056-5623

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Abstract

Aim: To demonstrate the design, fabrication and testing of conformable conducting biomaterials that encourage cell alignment. Materials & methods: Thin conducting composite biomaterials based on multilayer films of poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) derivatives, chitosan and gelatin were prepared in a layer-by-layer fashion. Fibroblasts were observed with fluorescence microscopy and their alignment (relative to the dipping direction and direction of electrical current passed through the films) was determined using ImageJ. Results: Fibroblasts adhered to and proliferated on the films. Fibroblasts aligned with the dipping direction used during film preparation and this was enhanced by a DC current. Conclusion: We report the preparation of conducting polymer-based films that enhance the alignment of fibroblasts on their surface which is an important feature of a variety of tissues. Lay abstract: Cells inhabit environments known as the extracellular matrix (ECM) which consists of a mixture of different biomolecules, and the precise composition and topographical properties are different in different tissues (e.g., bone, brain, muscle, skin). Cells interact intimately with the ECM, not only constructing the biomolecules, but assist its organization in 3D space, and its degradation (which is important for tissue remodeling); reciprocally, cells respond to the ECM (e.g., by modifying their size, shape, etc). Cellular alignment is observed in organs and tissues such as bones, muscles and skin, and this alignment is important for the healthy functioning of the organ/tissue. Here, we present a novel method of aligning cells on biomaterials, simply by applying an electrical current through the biomaterial.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Future Science OA
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2500/2502
Subjects:
ID Code:
79014
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
12 Apr 2016 08:06
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
29 Nov 2020 03:29