Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’:a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland

Donaldson, Christopher and Gregory, Ian and Murrieta-Flores, Patricia (2015) Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’:a GIS study of literary tourism in Victorian Lakeland. Journal of Victorian Culture, 20 (3). pp. 287-307. ISSN 1355-5502

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Abstract

This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. In doing so, it creates a step change to the integration of digital methodologies in the humanities. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley’s A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District’s principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland’s literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region’s other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Journal of Victorian Culture
Additional Information:
c 2015 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons. org/Licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in anymedium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1200/1202
Subjects:
ID Code:
74054
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
18 Jun 2015 06:00
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
26 Sep 2020 03:20