Chasing our tails : psychological, institutional and societal paradoxes in natural resource management, sustainability, and climate change in Australia.

Browne, A. L. and Bishop, B. J. (2011) Chasing our tails : psychological, institutional and societal paradoxes in natural resource management, sustainability, and climate change in Australia. American Journal of Community Psychology, 47 (3). pp. 354-361. ISSN 0091-0562

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Abstract

Natural Resource Management (NRM) and Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) have been guiding frameworks in Australia for a number of decades. Recently, NRM and ESD have become central to climate change mitigation. In this paper, we explore the psychological paradoxes that function within climate change settings, with particular attention devoted to the way that research and development reinforces these paradoxes by advocating for participatory forms of inquiry. Paradox emerges in NRM at psychological, institutional, and organisational levels. Paradoxes are also features of different forms of democracy such as neoliberal and participatory democracy. Although NRM, ESD and climate change are often conceptualised as distinct issue domains, these policy areas are fundamentally interconnected in both theory and in practice. This interconnection between these policy and research settings, reflections on paradox, and the experience of incorporating community psychology into the paradoxical settings of NRM and climate change are captured in this paper.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
American Journal of Community Psychology
Additional Information:
The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/libraryofcongress/hn
Subjects:
ID Code:
31790
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
12 Feb 2010 11:21
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
28 Mar 2020 02:26