Memory for faces and objects by deaf and hearing signers and hearing nonsigners.

Arnold, Paul and Murray, Craig (1998) Memory for faces and objects by deaf and hearing signers and hearing nonsigners. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 27 (4). pp. 481-497. ISSN 0090-6905

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Abstract

The memory of 11 deaf and 11 hearing British Sign Language users and 11 hearing nonsigners for pictures of faces of and verbalizable objects was measured using the game Concentration. The three groups performed at the same level for the objects. In contrast the deaf signers were better for faces than the hearing signers, who in turn were superior to the hearing nonsigners, who were the worst. Three hypotheses were made: That there would be no significant difference in terms of the number of attempts between the three groups on the verbalizable object task, that the hearing and deaf signers would demonstrate superior performance to that of the hearing nonsigners on the matching faces task, and that the hearing and deaf signers would exhibit similar performance levels on the matching faces task. The first two hypotheses were supported, but the third was not. Deaf signers were found to be superior for memory for faces to hearing signers and hearing nonsigners. Possible explanations for the findings are discussed,including the possibility that deafness and the long use of sign language have additive effects.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Journal of Psycholinguistic Research
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/researchoutput/libraryofcongress/r1
Subjects:
ID Code:
26090
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
16 Mar 2009 15:02
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
08 Jul 2020 02:04