An ethnography of “Amazonian Shamanism” in Britain : an examination of the migration of spiritual and healing practices native to Amazon communities

Rowberry, Kerry Joanne and Grimwood, Thomas and Convery, Ian (2024) An ethnography of “Amazonian Shamanism” in Britain : an examination of the migration of spiritual and healing practices native to Amazon communities. PhD thesis, Lancaster University.

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Abstract

Traditionally in Great Britain (Britain), and what is commonly referred to as ‘Western society’, psychedelic use has been seen as a tool of revelry; a controversial pastime conducted by countercultural movements. To some cultures, the picture could not be more polarised. For centuries particular plants and fungi have been used to elicit an altered state of consciousness in the interest of healing, to enhance spirituality, and to provide guidance on how to manage life’s challenges. This research takes a lens to the migration of such practices, specifically from the Amazon region in South America, into Britain. Conducted and presented as an ethnography, this work aims to create a holistic picture of the phenomenon; to understand the motives and beliefs of those involved; to highlight the value it has to them; to consider the impact it has had on their lives; and to understand their attitudes to their own cultural environment. The ethnography is influenced by the work of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, and their conceptualisation of the rhizomatic connections between distinguished phenomenon; a postmodern, philosophical approach that reflects some ideas and beliefs put forward by the research’s participants.

Item Type:
Thesis (PhD)
ID Code:
221089
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
05 Jun 2024 15:00
Refereed?:
No
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
20 Jun 2024 23:37