Testing and optimizing metabarcoding of iDNA from dung beetles to sample mammals in the hyperdiverse Neotropics

Saranholi, Bruno H. and França, Filipe M. and Vogler, Alfried P. and Barlow, Jos and Vaz de Mello, Fernando Z. and Maldaner, Maria E. and Carvalho, Edrielly and Gestich, Carla C. and Howes, Benjamin and Banks‐Leite, Cristina and Galetti, Pedro M. (2024) Testing and optimizing metabarcoding of iDNA from dung beetles to sample mammals in the hyperdiverse Neotropics. Molecular Ecology Resources, 24 (5): e13961. ISSN 1755-098X

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Abstract

Over the past few years, insects have been used as samplers of vertebrate diversity by assessing the ingested-derived DNA (iDNA), and dung beetles have been shown to be a good mammal sampler given their broad feeding preference, wide distribution and easy sampling. Here, we tested and optimized the use of iDNA from dung beetles to assess the mammal community by evaluating if some biological and methodological aspects affect the use of dung beetles as mammal species samplers. We collected 403 dung beetles from 60 pitfall traps. iDNA from each dung beetle was sequenced by metabarcoding using two mini-barcodes (12SrRNA and 16SrRNA). We assessed whether dung beetles with different traits related to feeding, nesting and body size differed in the number of mammal species found in their iDNA. We also tested differences among four killing solutions in preserving the iDNA and compared the effectiveness of each mini barcode to recover mammals. We identified a total of 50 mammal OTUs (operational taxonomic unit), including terrestrial and arboreal species from 10 different orders. We found that at least one mammal-matching sequence was obtained from 70% of the dung beetle specimens. The number of mammal OTUs obtained did not vary with dung beetle traits as well as between the killing solutions. The 16SrRNA mini-barcode recovered a higher number of mammal OTUs than 12SrRNA, although both sets were partly non-overlapping. Thus, the complete mammal diversity may not be achieved by using only one of them. This study refines the methodology for routine assessment of tropical mammal communities via dung beetle 'samplers' and its universal applicability independently of the species traits of local beetle communities. [Abstract copyright: © 2024 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.]

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Molecular Ecology Resources
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/1100/1105
Subjects:
?? amazonian rain forestbiodiversitybiomonitoringinvertebrate‐derived dnametabarcodingecology, evolution, behavior and systematicsgeneticsbiotechnology ??
ID Code:
220708
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
29 May 2024 10:05
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
17 Jun 2024 00:12