Examining well-being and cognitive function in people with long Covid and ME/CFS, and age-matched healthy controls : A Case-Case-Control Study

Sanal-Hayes, Nilihan E.M. and Mclaughlin, Marie and Hayes, Lawrence D. and Berry, Ethan C.J. and Sculthorpe, Nicholas F. (2024) Examining well-being and cognitive function in people with long Covid and ME/CFS, and age-matched healthy controls : A Case-Case-Control Study. The American Journal of Medicine. ISSN 0002-9343 (In Press)

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Abstract

Purpose Well-being and cognitive function had not previously been compared between people with long COVID and people with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS). Therefore, this study examined well-being and cognitive function in people with long COVID (∼16 months illness duration; n= 17) and ME/CFS (∼16 years illness duration; n=24), versus age-matched healthy controls (n=16). Methods Well-being was examined using several questionnaires, namely the Health Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), Post-exertional malaise (PEM), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), European Quality of Life-5 Domains (EQ-5D), MRC Dyspnoea, Self-Efficacy (SELTC), The Edinburgh Neurosymptoms Questionnaire (ENS), General Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7), and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9). Cognitive function was examined using Single Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Stroop test, and Trails A and B. These were delivered via a mobile application (app) built specifically for this remote data collection. Results The main findings of the present investigation were that people with ME/CFS and people with long COVID were generally comparable on all well-being and cognitive function measures, but self-reported worse values for pain, fatigue, Post-exertional malaise, sleep quality, general well-being in relation to mobility, usual activities, self-care, breathlessness, neurological symptoms, self-efficacy, and other well-being such as anxiety and depression, compared to controls. There was no effect of group for cognitive function measures. Conclusions These data suggest that both people with long COVID and people with ME/CFS have similar impairment on well-being measures examined herein. Therefore, interventions that target well-being of people with ME/CFS and long COVID are required.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
The American Journal of Medicine
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700
Subjects:
?? medicine(all) ??
ID Code:
219934
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
16 May 2024 10:55
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
In Press
Last Modified:
23 Jun 2024 01:48