Creating 3D objects with integrated electronics via multiphoton fabrication in vitro and in vivo

Baldock, Sara and Kevin, Punarja and Harper, Garry and Griffin, Rebecca and Genedy, Hussein and Fong, James and Zhao, Zhiyi and Zhang, Zijian and Shen, Yaochun and Lin, Hungyen and Au, Catherine and Martin, Jack and Ashton, Mark and Haskew, Mathew and Stewart, Beverley and Efremova, Olga and Esfahani, Reza and Emsley, Hedley and Appleby, John and Cheneler, David and Cummings, Damian M. and Benedetto, Alex and Hardy, John (2023) Creating 3D objects with integrated electronics via multiphoton fabrication in vitro and in vivo. Advanced Materials Technologies, 8 (11): 2201274. ISSN 2365-709X

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Abstract

3D objects with integrated electronics are produced using an additive manufacturing approach relying on multiphoton fabrication (direct laser writing, (DLW)). Conducting polymer-based structures (with micrometer-millimeter scale features) are printed within exemplar matrices, including an elastomer (polydimethylsiloxane, (PDMS)) have been widely investigated for biomedical applications. The fidelity of the printing process in PDMS is assessed by optical coherence tomography, and the conducting polymer structures are demonstrated to be capable of stimulating mouse brain tissue in vitro. Furthermore, the applicability of the approach to printing structures in vivo is demonstrated in live nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans). These results highlight the potential for such additive manufacturing approaches to produce next-generation advanced material technologies, notably integrated electronics for technical and medical applications (e.g., human-computer interfaces).

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Advanced Materials Technologies
Uncontrolled Keywords:
Research Output Funding/yes_externally_funded
Subjects:
?? additive manufacturingbioelectronicsconducting polymersintegrated electronicsneural electrodesyes - externally fundedyeschemistry(all)materials science(all)engineering(all)neuroscience(all)fst keywords:fhm keywordssdg 3 - good health and well-beingsdg 9 - ??
ID Code:
187175
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
21 Feb 2023 11:35
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
17 Jun 2024 00:07