Recognition, representation, and relationships: how the UK Relationships and Sex Education Curriculum (2020) can meet the needs of and offer representation to young disabled and neurodivergent or neurodiverse people with LGBT+ identities.

Dring - Turner, Helen (2022) Recognition, representation, and relationships: how the UK Relationships and Sex Education Curriculum (2020) can meet the needs of and offer representation to young disabled and neurodivergent or neurodiverse people with LGBT+ identities. PhD thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) became mandatory in all secondary schools in England in September 2020. Prior to this, delivery of RSE was neither compulsory nor consistent across England, meaning student experience differed widely. Added to this is a climate of prohibitive legislation surrounding the teaching of homosexuality, leading to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT+) young people to often be excluded from RSE. Special schools were also often behind mainstream schools in their delivery of RSE curricula, causing a disparity between disabled and non-disabled young people (OFSTED, 2013). This thesis takes as its starting point the idea that comprehensive RSE should allow all young people to ‘interact with each other as equals’ (Fraser, 2000, p. 36). Through a Critical Discourse Analysis, it analyses its representation of young LGBT+ people who are disabled and neurodivergent or neurodiverse at a text level. A series of phenomenological interviews examine previous experiences of young people who did not benefit from the statutory curriculum to offer a case for the need for inclusive RSE. These two elements are then combined into suggestions for practice for teachers and facilitators delivering the curriculum. This investigation makes an original contribution to research through its examination of how Relationships and Sex Education and its inclusivity contribute to young adults’ experience of participatory parity and their ability to interact with each other as equals. The findings have implications for curriculum design, social representation, and classroom practice. Keywords: Relationships and Sex Education, Disability, Curricula, Critical Discourse Analysis.

Item Type:
Thesis (PhD)
ID Code:
179534
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
18 Nov 2022 09:45
Refereed?:
No
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
21 Nov 2022 12:22