TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP ATTENTIONAL BIASES FOR SMOKING-RELATED STIMULI: COMPARING DEPENDENT AND NON-DEPENDENT SMOKERS:Attentional biases in dependent and non-dependent smokers

Wilcockson, Thomas and Pothos, Emmanuel and Osborne, Ashley and Crawford, Trevor (2021) TOP-DOWN AND BOTTOM-UP ATTENTIONAL BIASES FOR SMOKING-RELATED STIMULI: COMPARING DEPENDENT AND NON-DEPENDENT SMOKERS:Attentional biases in dependent and non-dependent smokers. Addictive Behaviors. ISSN 0306-4603 (In Press)

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Abstract

Introduction: Substance use causes attentional biases for substance-related stimuli. Both bottom-up (preferential processing) and top-down (inhibitory control) processes are involved in attentional biases. We explored these aspects of attentional bias by using dependent and non-dependent cigarette smokers in order to see whether these two groups would differ in terms of general inhibitory control, bottom-up attentional bias, and top-down attentional biases. This enables us to see whether consumption behaviour would affect these cognitive responses to smoking-related stimuli. Methods: Smokers were categorised as either dependent (N=26) or non-dependent (N=34) smokers. A further group of non-smokers (N=32) were recruited to act as controls. Participants then completed a behavioural inhibition task with general stimuli, a smoking-related eye tracking version of the dot-probe task, and an eye-tracking inhibition task with smoking-related stimuli. Results: Results indicated that dependent smokers had decreased inhibition and increased attentional bias for smoking-related stimuli (and not control stimuli). By contrast, a decreased inhibition for smoking-related stimuli (in comparison to control stimuli) was not observed for non-dependent smokers. Conclusions: Preferential processing of substance-related stimuli may indicate usage of a substance, whereas poor inhibitory control for substance-related stimuli may only emerge if dependence develops. The results suggest that how people engage with substance abuse is important for top-down attentional biases.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Addictive Behaviors
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2701
Subjects:
ID Code:
151989
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
22 Feb 2021 12:20
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
In Press
Last Modified:
23 Feb 2021 09:27