Epistemic Strategies in Ethical Review:REB Members’ Experiences of Assessing Probable Impacts of Research for Human Subjects

Cox, S.M. and McDonald, M. and Townsend, Anne (2019) Epistemic Strategies in Ethical Review:REB Members’ Experiences of Assessing Probable Impacts of Research for Human Subjects. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics. ISSN 1556-2646

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Abstract

Research ethics boards (REBs) are charged with applying ethical standards to protect the rights and interests of research subjects. Little, however, is known about how REB members perceive probable impacts of research participation for subjects. Drawing on in-depth interviews with 40 Canadian REB members, we identify three frequently reported epistemic strategies, including reliance on a local REB culture or ethos, use of resident authorities, and protective imagination. Far less commonly described strategies included direct or indirect contact with research subjects. REB members also reflected upon significant gaps in their knowledge and thus the importance of knowing what we don't know. Recommendations arising from this support an evidence-based practice for ethics review involving clear epistemic standards for REBs learning about subjects' experiences.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3300/3308
Subjects:
ID Code:
138795
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
24 Jun 2020 13:45
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
24 Jun 2020 13:45