Extending architectural theories of space syntax to understand the effect of environment on the salience of situated displays

Dalton, Nick and Marshall, Paul and Dalton, Ruth (2013) Extending architectural theories of space syntax to understand the effect of environment on the salience of situated displays. In: PerDis 2013 - Proceedings. ACM, United States, pp. 73-78. ISBN 9781450320962

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Abstract

Research is increasingly focusing on the role of spatial context in encouraging or discouraging interaction with public displays. However, there are few tools available to aid researchers in analyzing space in terms of its relevant properties when deciding where the most appropriate location is to position a display. In this paper we argue that a taxonomy of space is necessary to begin to understand how to enhance interaction within it. Previous work has suggested that a group of architectural theories known collectively as Space Syntax may be relevant to the problem of positioning situated displays. This paper reports on an initial study conducted to examine the utility of Space Syntax measures for positioning public displays for maximum salience. The outcome of the study was that different representations were found to be more memorable when positioned in different shapes of spaces. Specifically, the memorably of text and images differed with the size and jaggedness of the space in which they were displayed. We suggest that tools need to be developed for public display researchers to systematically study these and similar effects across a variety of contexts. We introduce software called Infinite Horizon that has been developed to facilitate this taxonomic work.

Item Type: Contribution in Book/Report/Proceedings
Subjects:
Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Medicine
Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences > Lancaster Institute for the Contemporary Arts
ID Code: 138634
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 05 Nov 2019 16:10
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2020 07:03
URI: https://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/138634

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