Not such an ordinary life: a comparison of employment, marital status and housing profiles of adults with and without intellectual disabilities

McMahon, Martin and Bowring, Darren Lee and Hatton, Chris (2019) Not such an ordinary life: a comparison of employment, marital status and housing profiles of adults with and without intellectual disabilities. Tizard Learning Disability Review. ISSN 1359-5474 (In Press)

[img] Text (TLDR Trends Final Paper pdf)
TLDR_Trends_Final_Paper_pdf.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 1 January 2050.
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial.

Download (157kB)

Abstract

Purpose Having paid work, relationships and a choice of where to live are common policy priorities for adults with intellectual disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to compare outcomes with respect to these three priorities between adults with intellectual disability and the general population in Jersey. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from 217 adults with intellectual disability known to services, and 2,350 adults without intellectual disability using a stratified random sample. Data on employment, marital status and accommodation profiles were compared. Findings In sum, 87 per cent of adults with intellectual disability were currently single vs 16 per cent of adults without intellectual disability; 23 per cent of working-age adults with intellectual disability were in paid employment vs 92 per cent of working-age adults without intellectual disability; and 57 per cent of adults with intellectual disability lived-in sheltered housing vs 2 per cent of adults without intellectual disability. Social implications Very few adults with intellectual disability are in paid employment or intimate relationships, and the majority live in sheltered, supported housing, with very few owning their own home. There is a significant disconnect between policy and reality. Considerable work is required to make an ordinary life the reality for adults with intellectual disability. Originality/value This study adds to the body of evidence that suggests people with intellectual disabilities are less likely to experience an ordinary life. Furthermore, it illustrates that despite Jersey being an affluent society, the same difficulties and barriers exist there for persons with an intellectual disability as in other jurisdictions.

Item Type: Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title: Tizard Learning Disability Review
Uncontrolled Keywords: /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/3200/3203
Subjects:
Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Health Research
ID Code: 138479
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 07 Nov 2019 16:15
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: In Press
Last Modified: 13 Dec 2019 05:41
URI: https://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/138479

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item