Substance use disorder treatment admissions and state-level prenatal substance use policies:Evidence from a national treatment database

Kozhmannil, Katy B. and Dowd, Bill and Ali, Mir M. and Novak, Priscilla and Chen, Jie (2019) Substance use disorder treatment admissions and state-level prenatal substance use policies:Evidence from a national treatment database. Addictive Behaviors, 90. pp. 272-277. ISSN 0306-4603

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Abstract

State policies pertaining to prenatal substance use have important implications for health outcomes of pregnant women and their infants. However, little is known about the impact of the various types of state-level prenatal substance use policies (i.e., treatment and supportive services; criminal justice initiatives; and health care provider reporting requirements) on substance use disorder treatment admissions. Using data from the 2002-2014 Treatment Episode Data Set - Admissions, we exploited state-level variation in the implementation of different types of policies to assess their impact on pregnant women's admission to substance use disorder treatment. The study found that state-level prenatal substance use policies focused only on the criminal justice sector were negatively associated with the proportion of women of reproductive age who were pregnant upon admission to treatment. Additionally, the implementation of policies that engaged all three sectors was positively associated with the proportion of women of reproductive age who were pregnant upon admission to treatment. These results were consistent across age groups and for both non-Hispanic white women and women of other racial/ethnic groups. The findings imply that states with cross-sector policy engagement around prenatal substance use and policies that take a multifaceted, comprehensive approach are more likely to see an increase in admissions to substance use disorder treatment during pregnancy.

Item Type: Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title: Addictive Behaviors
Additional Information: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Addictive Behaviors. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Addictive Behaviors, 90, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.11.019
Uncontrolled Keywords: /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2700/2701
Subjects:
Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Health Research
ID Code: 136804
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 20 Nov 2019 09:15
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 19 Jan 2020 05:47
URI: https://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/136804

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