Siraiki : A Sociolinguistic Study of Language Desertion.

Asif, Saiqa Imtiaz (2005) Siraiki : A Sociolinguistic Study of Language Desertion. PhD thesis, UNSPECIFIED.

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Abstract

The main focus of this thesis is the phenomenon of Siraiki language maintenance language shift in Multan. This is the first study of its kind carried out on any Pakistani language. The study examines the speech practices of rural and urban Siraiki Multanis in the home domain in the light of various demographic, social, political, and affective factors. It highlights the complex relationship of these factors with regard to change in the language use patterns of the Siraikis. The major sources of data for this study comprise of results from a matched-guise test, recorded speech of Siraikis in the home domain, and interviews. Triangulation of data and methods have been used in this research. The findings suggest that the phenomenon of Siraiki language maintenance/shift is differential in rural and urban Multan and no single factor can be held responsible for any changed or changing speech practices of the Siraikis. The conclusion argues that the attitude of the speakers towards their language is equally important in this process. It also brings to light the inadequacy of both the terminology and the so-called universal models that attempt to account for this complex sociolinguistic phenomenon. This research has educational and social implications and makes a theoretical and methodological contribution to the field of sociolinguistics. It is hoped that it will raise the awareness of Pakistanis in general and Siraikis in particular about the fate and the treatment of their mother tongues by themselves and by the general society. This study also hopes to broaden our understanding of the phenomenon of language maintenance/shift.

Item Type:
Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information:
Thesis (Ph.D.)--Lancaster University (United Kingdom), 2005.
Subjects:
ID Code:
133467
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
02 May 2019 16:28
Refereed?:
No
Published?:
Unpublished
Last Modified:
29 Sep 2020 07:09