Self-Compassion and Depression, Anxiety, and Resilience in Adults with Epilepsy

Baker, David and Caswell, Helen and Eccles, Fiona Juliet Rosalind (2019) Self-Compassion and Depression, Anxiety, and Resilience in Adults with Epilepsy. Epilepsy and Behavior, 90. pp. 154-161. ISSN 1525-5050

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Abstract

Background Research suggests that people with epilepsy (PWE) are more likely to experience depression and anxiety than the general population. Given the adversity associated with the condition, resilience may also be important. However, to date resilience has been largely overlooked in the epilepsy literature. Self-compassion has been widely associated with improved psychological wellbeing and, to a lesser extent, resilience. However, the relationship between self-compassion and depression, anxiety, and resilience in PWE has not been examined. Objectives Using a quantitative cross-sectional survey design, the aim of the present study was to examine the extent to which self-compassion predicted depression, anxiety, and resilience when controlling for demographic and illness-related variables. Methods Adults with epilepsy were invited to take part in a survey online or in epilepsy or neurology clinics. Two-hundred and seventy participants completed the survey and data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression models. Results In this sample of PWE, self-compassion significantly predicted lower depression and anxiety and higher resilience when other significant sociodemographic and illness-related variables had been taken into account. Conclusions The findings of the present study indicate that self-compassion could be an important factor in determining psychological outcomes for adults with epilepsy and its role is worthy of further exploration to help improve psychological outcomes for PWE.

Item Type: Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title: Epilepsy and Behavior
Additional Information: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Physics Reports. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Epilepsy & Behavior, 90, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.11.025
Uncontrolled Keywords: /dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2800/2808
Subjects:
Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Health Research
ID Code: 129090
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 23 Nov 2018 11:14
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2019 04:37
URI: https://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/129090

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