Correlates of stigma in adults with epilepsy:A systematic review of quantitative studies

Baker, David and Eccles, Fiona Juliet Rosalind and Caswell, Helen (2018) Correlates of stigma in adults with epilepsy:A systematic review of quantitative studies. Epilepsy and Behavior, 83. pp. 67-80. ISSN 1525-5050

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Abstract

Objectives The aim of this review was to identify quantitative correlates, predictors, and outcomes of stigma in adults with epilepsy living in Western countries. Methods To identify relevant literature, four academic databases (PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus) were systematically searched using key terms related to stigma and epilepsy. Results Thirty-three research papers reporting findings from 25 quantitative studies of correlates of stigma in epilepsy were identified. The findings suggest that stigma can be predicted by demographic, illness-related, and psychosocial factors, although associations were found to be highly culturally specific. Outcomes of stigma in people with epilepsy were replicated more consistently across cultures, and its impact was significant. Detrimental effects included both worse physical health, including less effective management of the condition, and reduced psychological well-being, including difficulties such as depression and anxiety. Implications Educational initiatives and therapeutic interventions that aim to address stigma in people with epilepsy are recommended; however, these need to be culturally informed to ensure that they are valid and effective.

Item Type:
Journal Article
Journal or Publication Title:
Epilepsy and Behavior
Additional Information:
This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Epilepsy & Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Epilepsy & Behavior, 83, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2018.02.016
Uncontrolled Keywords:
/dk/atira/pure/subjectarea/asjc/2800/2808
Subjects:
ID Code:
123564
Deposited By:
Deposited On:
22 Feb 2018 16:32
Refereed?:
Yes
Published?:
Published
Last Modified:
23 Sep 2020 04:04