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Leishmania donovani is the only cause of visceral leishmaniasis in East Africa; previous descriptions of L. infantum and "L. archibaldi" from this region are a consequence of convergent evolution in the isoenzyme data

Jamjoom, M B and Ashford, R W and Bates, P A and Chance, M L and Kemp, S J and Watts, P C and Noyes, H A (2004) Leishmania donovani is the only cause of visceral leishmaniasis in East Africa; previous descriptions of L. infantum and "L. archibaldi" from this region are a consequence of convergent evolution in the isoenzyme data. Parasitology, 129 (4). pp. 399-409. ISSN 0031-1820

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    Abstract

    Isoenzyme-based studies have identified 3 taxa/species/'phylogenetic complexes' as agents of visceral leishmaniasis in Sudan: L. donovani, L. infantum and "L. archibaldi". However, these observations remain controversial. A new chitinase gene phylogeny was constructed in which stocks of all 3 putative species isolated in Sudan formed a monophyletic clade. In order to construct a more robust classification of the L. donovani complex, a panel of 16 microsatellite markers was used to describe 39 stocks of these 3 species. All "L. donovani complex" stocks from Sudan were again found to form a single monophyletic clade. L. donovani ss stocks from India and Kenya were found to form 2 region-specific clades. The partial sequence of the glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) gene of 17 L. donovani complex stocks was obtained. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the GOT gene appeared to underlie the isoenzyme classification. It was concluded that isoenzyme-based identification is unsafe for stocks isolated in L. donovani endemic areas and identified as L. infantum. It was also concluded that the name L. archibaldi is invalid and that only a single visceralizing species, Leishmania donovani, is found in East Africa.

    Item Type: Article
    Journal or Publication Title: Parasitology
    Additional Information: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PAR The final, definitive version of this article has been published in the Journal, Parasitology, 129 (4), pp 339-409 2004, © 2004 Cambridge University Press.
    Uncontrolled Keywords: aspartate aminotransferase ; microsatellites ; MLEE ; kala azar ; Ethiopia ; chagasi
    Subjects: Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR355 Virology
    Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Biomedical & Life Sciences
    ID Code: 56045
    Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
    Deposited On: 20 Jul 2012 13:47
    Refereed?: Yes
    Published?: Published
    Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 20:46
    Identification Number:
    URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/56045

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