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Who's afraid of critical social science?

Sayer, Andrew (2009) Who's afraid of critical social science? Current Sociology, 57 (6). pp. 767-786.

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Abstract

The article offers an assessment of rationales for critical social science (CSS), noting that over the last three decades these have become increasingly cautious and timid, so that, for example, critique is reduced to uncovering hidden presuppositions and deepening reflexivity. First, the article outlines a simple conception of CSS based on the standpoint of the reduction of illusion, distinguishes this from scepticism and partisanship, and notes the importance of the denaturalization of social forms, Second, it assesses the critical standpoint of freedom. Third, the article argues that a stronger standpoint of the critique of avoidable suffering is needed and already implicit in limited form in existing CSS. Fourth, the article explores and counters some of the key reasons for the retreat of critique, and concludes.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Current Sociology
Uncontrolled Keywords: critical social science ; critique ; denaturalization ; freedom ; illusion
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Departments: Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology
ID Code: 54990
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 11 Jun 2012 09:19
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 20:33
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/54990

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