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Trichotomous Processes in Early Memory Development, Aging, and Neurocognitive Impairment: A Unified Theory

Brainerd, C. J. and Reyna, V. F. and Howe, Mark L. (2009) Trichotomous Processes in Early Memory Development, Aging, and Neurocognitive Impairment: A Unified Theory. Psychological Review, 116 (4). pp. 783-832. ISSN 0033-295X

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Abstract

One of the most extensively investigated topics in the adult memory literature, dual memory processes, has had virtually no impact on the study of early memory development. The authors remove the key obstacles to such research by formulating a trichotomous theory of recall that combines the traditional dual processes of recollection and familiarity with a reconstruction process. The theory is then embedded in a hidden Markov model that measures all 3 processes with low-burden tasks that are appropriate for even young children. These techniques are applied to a large corpus of developmental studies of recall, yielding stable findings about the emergence of dual memory processes between childhood and young adulthood and generating tests of many theoretical predictions. The techniques are extended to the study of healthy aging and to the memory sequelae of common forms of neurocognitive impairment, resulting in a theoretical framework that is unified over 4 major domains of memory research: early development, mainstream adult research, aging, and neurocognitive impairment. The techniques are also extended to recognition, creating a unified dual process framework for recall and recognition.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Psychological Review
Uncontrolled Keywords: memory development ; dual memory processes ; aging ; neurocognitive impairment ; hidden Markov models ; MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT ; OF-LEARNING ANALYSIS ; HIDDEN-MARKOV-MODELS ; STORAGE-RETRIEVAL PROCESSES ; FALSE RECOGNITION ; ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE ; FREE-RECALL ; CHILDRENS MEMORY ; NONCRITERIAL RECOLLECTION ; RETENTION INTERVAL
Subjects: UNSPECIFIED
Departments: Faculty of Science and Technology > Psychology
ID Code: 52771
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 22 Feb 2012 16:47
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 20:09
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/52771

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