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The response to challenging behaviour by care staff: emotional responses, attributions of cause and observations of practice

Bailey, B A and Hare, D J and Hatton, C and Limb, K (2006) The response to challenging behaviour by care staff: emotional responses, attributions of cause and observations of practice. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 50. pp. 199-211. ISSN 0964-2633

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Abstract

Bacground Previous studies have attempted to apply Weiner's attributional model of helping behaviour to care staff who work with service users with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviours by using studies based on vignettes. The aims of the current study were to investigate the application of Weiner's model to 'real' service users with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviours and to observe the care staff's actual responses to challenging behaviours displayed by service users. Also, to compare care staff attributions, emotions, optimism, willingness to help and observed helping behaviours for self-injurious behaviours in comparison to other forms of challenging behaviours. Method A total of 27 care staff completed two sets of measures, one set regarding a self-injurious behaviour and the other regarding other forms of challenging behaviour. An additional 16 staff completed one set of measures. The measures focused on care staff attributions, emotions, optimism and willingness to help. Also, 16 of the care staff were observed interacting with the service users to collect data regarding their responses to challenging behaviours. Results For both self-injurious behaviours and other forms of challenging behaviour, associations were found between the care staff internal, stable and uncontrollable attribution scores and care staff negative emotion scores. However, no associations were found between the care staff levels of emotion, optimism and willingness to help. Some associations were found between the care staff levels of willingness to help and observed helping behaviours. There were significant differences between the care staff attribution scores with higher scores being obtained for uncontrollable and stable attributions for other forms of challenging behaviours. No significant differences were found between the care staff emotions, optimism, willingness to help and observed helping behaviours. Conclusions The results did not provide support for Weiner's attributional model of helping behaviour. However, a preliminary model of negative care staff behaviour was derived from the exploratory analyses completed. This model proposes that there are associations between internal, stable and uncontrollable attributions and negative emotions in care staff and also between negative emotions and negative behaviours displayed by care staff in response to the actions of service users.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research
Uncontrolled Keywords: challenging behaviour ; self-injurious behaviour ; staff behaviour ; staff emotions ; DISABILITIES ; SERVICES ; PEOPLE ; HEALTH ; LIFE
Subjects: UNSPECIFIED
Departments: Faculty of Health and Medicine > Health Research
ID Code: 51757
Deposited By: ep_importer_pure
Deposited On: 04 Dec 2011 16:36
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2014 22:54
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/51757

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