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Science of helium in technology.

McClintock, Peter V. E. (1987) Science of helium in technology. Nature, 326 (6111). p. 340. ISSN 1476-4687

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Abstract

Liquid helium is something of an oddity. Its existence as a liquid at all is rather marginal, as shown by the ease with which it can be vaporized by tiny influxes of heat - just one watt is enough to evaporate about a litre of liquid in an hour. For temperatures below 2.17K, it behaves as though it were an interpenetrating mixture of two completely miscible fluids: a (relatively ordinary) normal fluid component, and a superfluid component which carries no entropy and whose viscosityis identically zero. It is the latter component that gives rise to liquid helium's celebrated frictionless-flow properties, enabling it, for example, to climb out of any open vessel in which it is placed.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Nature
Additional Information: Review of "Helium Cryogenics" by Steven W. Van Sciver, Plenum, 1986. Pp.429.
Subjects: Q Science > QC Physics
Departments: Faculty of Science and Technology > Physics
ID Code: 33029
Deposited By: Professor P. V. E. McClintock
Deposited On: 30 Apr 2010 13:18
Refereed?: No
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2014 21:50
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/33029

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