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Infrared spectral analysis of MCF-7 cells treated with serum-lipid extracts of Chinese origin segregates predominantly brominated flame retardant-exposed subjects from those with mainly organochlorine exposures.

Bi, Xinhui and Walsh, Michael J. and Wei, Xiaomin and Sheng, Guoying and Fu, Jiamo and Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L. and Thomas, Gareth O. and Jones, Kevin C. and Martin, Francis L. (2007) Infrared spectral analysis of MCF-7 cells treated with serum-lipid extracts of Chinese origin segregates predominantly brominated flame retardant-exposed subjects from those with mainly organochlorine exposures. Environmental Science & Technology, 41 (16). pp. 5915-5922. ISSN 0013-936X

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Abstract

We set out to determine whether infrared (IR) spectra of treated MCF-7 cells derived using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform IR (ATR) microspectroscopy could be used to signature different exposures. Serum-lipid samples from residents living in an electronics waste (e-waste) dismantling region (Region E, n = 26) in the south of P.R. China or from a nearby region (Region S, n = 20) associated with the fishing industry were obtained. Following extraction, estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 cells were treated for 24 h with ≤5-mg lipid equivalent of individual extracts prior to ethanol fixation; subsequently, IR spectra of treated-cell populations were obtained using ATR microspectroscopy. Levels of organochlorinated and brominated compounds in parallel extracts were also determined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to ascertain whether IR-spectral scores would cluster according to particular cohort. Scores plots following PCA highlighted significant clustering dependent on with which set of extracts MCF-7 cells were treated. This suggests marked differences in the cell-biochemical modulating effects induced by either set of extracts. Analysis of contaminant profiles in the extracts showed that polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) accounted for 46.0% of total organohalogens and were higher than dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) in Region E; DDTs were the major contaminants (85.2% of total contaminant load) compared to PBDEs (8.7%) in Region S. These results suggest that ATR microspectroscopy can segregate cell-biochemical effects as a consequence of very different exposure paradigms.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Environmental Science & Technology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Departments: Faculty of Science and Technology > Lancaster Environment Centre
Faculty of Health and Medicine
ID Code: 28055
Deposited By: Mr Richard Ingham
Deposited On: 03 Nov 2009 09:29
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 16:43
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/28055

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