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The varieties of ecological piety.

Szerszynski, Bronislaw (1997) The varieties of ecological piety. World Views: Environment, Culture, Religion, 1 (1). pp. 37-55.

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Abstract

The idea of nature's sacrality, contrasting starkly with industrial modernity's overwhelmingly instrumental valuation of non-human nature, visibly inform philosophical positions such as deep ecology and Gaia theory. But at a more unspoken level they can also be seen as suffusing a wider societal sensibility, evident not least in popular values regarding nature. But, granted that many people would ascribe such a value to nature, how are such beliefs embodied in their lives? An attention to the theological or cosmological level can only take us so far in understanding the dynamics of culture; we need also to attend to questions of practice, ritual, community and relationship, for it is through such elements that more abstract ideas about humanity's place in the universe are given both support and expression. It is in this spirit of inquiry that this paper proceeds, arguing that religious forms of action and corporateness characteristic of monastic, sectarian, churchly, and folk religiosity have shaped the way that contemporary environmental values are embodied in the practices and experience of everyday life.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: World Views: Environment, Culture, Religion
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Departments: Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences > Politics & International Relations (Merged into PPR 2010-08-01)
Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology
ID Code: 22111
Deposited By: ep_ss_importer
Deposited On: 18 Feb 2009 14:46
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 15:56
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/22111

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