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Sibling interaction of children with learning disabilities: a comparison of autism and downs-syndrome.

Knott, F. and Lewis, C. and Williams, T. (1995) Sibling interaction of children with learning disabilities: a comparison of autism and downs-syndrome. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 36 (6). pp. 965-976.

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Abstract

Two potentially contrasting hypotheses can be generated about sibling interactions involving a child with Down's syndrome or autism. Research on siblings would predict that learning disabled children adopt responsive roles. Studies of children with autism would predict impoverished interactions. Home observations were conducted on 30 sibling pairs involving children with autism or Down's syndrome. Both hypotheses were partially supported. All learning disabled children engaged in frequent bouts of interaction, usually directed by their sibling. While children with autism engaged in fewer bouts and imitated less, they did reciprocate their siblings' initiations. Sibling encounters provide a unique opportunity for such children to learn about social relationships.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Departments: Faculty of Science and Technology > Psychology
Faculty of Arts & Social Sciences > Sociology
ID Code: 19017
Deposited By: ep_ss_importer
Deposited On: 04 Nov 2008 16:44
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 26 Jul 2012 15:24
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/19017

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