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The role of place and metaphor in racial exclusion: South Africa’s beaches as sites of shifting racialisation.

Durrheim, Kevin and Dixon, John A. (2001) The role of place and metaphor in racial exclusion: South Africa’s beaches as sites of shifting racialisation. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 24 (3). pp. 433-450. ISSN 0141-9870

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Abstract

This article examines the rhetoric of racial exclusion as applied to South Africa's beaches between 1982 and 1995, a period during which beach apartheid was progressively dismantled. Using a sample of 400 newspaper articles as textual evidence, we demonstrate how racist rhetoric during this period exploited ideological constructions of space and place. We focus on a set of arguments that constructed beaches as the legitimate preserve of the (white) family and black beach-goers as a threat to this place image. The shift from the old to the new South Africa provides a historical lens through which we view the variable deployment of this familiar rhetoric of transgression and exclusion. Whereas in the 1980s, black political protest was portrayed as disrupting the 'fun-in-the-sun' essence of beaches, in the 1990s a neo-separatist discourse of manners predominated. References to beaches as family places were used multiply and variably to justify racial exclusion and segregation.

Item Type: Article
Journal or Publication Title: Ethnic and Racial Studies
Uncontrolled Keywords: Racism ; Discourse ; Beaches ; The ; Family ; Space ; Segregation
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Departments: Faculty of Science and Technology > Psychology
ID Code: 10938
Deposited By: Dr John Dixon
Deposited On: 30 Jul 2008 11:38
Refereed?: Yes
Published?: Published
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2014 12:06
Identification Number:
URI: http://eprints.lancs.ac.uk/id/eprint/10938

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